Posted: 28.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
Figures: Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Drawing 1. Drawing 2.
Posted: 25.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 11. Bibliography/Abbreviations When referring to illustrations in the present paper we omit the reference to the place (simply “fig. 1“), and when referring to illustrations in other publications we omit in all unequivocal cases the reference to the type of illustration (simply “Kramrisch In 107“). “Neg. no.“ designates unpublished photos in our own collection. All technical terms have been...
Posted: 24.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 9. Taxonomy The study of an individual motif is concerned with both: collection and organization of the available data. A few general remarks concerning the methods of organization may, therefore, not be superfluous. Our formulation will be of a general nature, but we are mainly guided by the experience acquired in the present study. We can start from two primary planes: form and iconography. Form is...
Posted: 23.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 8. The fantastic tree In the medieval and post-medieval art of Central and Western India we come across a number of vegetable motifs which have no common denominator but which can perhaps be grouped together under the label “fantastic tree.“ This grouping suggests itself mainly in connection with the art of the post-medieval Jaina temple at Ranekpur (Crowe Tr, JRM fig. 179), but perhaps it is applicable...
Posted: 22.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 7. A.D. 900-1100: The banana plant in medieval art In medieval art we find invariably the calyx formula. The way in which it is employed marks a clear departure from the earlier and somewhat casual renderings. The motif is now included in the iconographic programmes of the steles as an element with a clear status. It is, however, no longer primarily connected with images of the Śaiva cycle. There is less...
Posted: 21.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 6. A.D. 750-950: The banana plant in early medieval art (supplement) It is unlikely that it would be the “small niche figures“ which attracted the banana plant motif. An alternative explanation of the facts presented in § 5 would be that the four relevant temples (and others belonging to the same period and area) reflect a more general predilection for banana plants as corner motifs (or corner fillers)...
Posted: 18.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 5. A.D. 750-900: The banana plant in early medieval art (niche figures) In the earlier periods, each specimen of the banana plant motif can be studied as an artistic realization in its own right. But as the number of specimens increase we wonder whether a classification (on morphological lines) might be possible. In discussing this issue we must distinguish between diversity (all related specimens form a...
Posted: 17.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 4. After A.D. 600: The banana plant in early medieval art (various specimens) In the present section we shall consider not only “Central India“ but the entire Northern belt. The first sites to the considered will be Nālanda, Paharpur, Mainamati and Muṇḍeśvarī. Photographs taken by Cl. and J. Bautze show that the banana plant occurs repeatedly on the panels above the plinth of a structure at...
Posted: 16.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
§ 2. Technical and methodical remarks We use the term “banana plant“ (“banana plant) both in descriptive and in analytic contexts. To demonstrate this difference we mention in connection with the word “kalaśa“ the phrases “Devī with kalaśa“ on the one hand (descriptive) and “pillar with pūrṇakalaśa capital“ on the other (analytic). Occasionally, the fuller form “banana plant motif“...
Posted: 15.05.2012
By Prof. Dr. Klaus Bruhn
A Vegetable Motif in Central Indian Art This essay is the fuller version of a paper read on the 24th German Oriental Conference ( XXIV. Deutscher Orientalistentag) held on September 26-30, 1988 in Cologne. I should like to express my gratitude to Prof. Peter Kunsmann for giving my English its final shape. Introduction On an earlier occasion, we had tried to establish a connection between a somewhat isolated...

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