Posted: 04.10.2012
By Justice T.K. Tukol
Jainism in South India There may not be any other religion in India which is as much misunderstood and misrepresented as Jainism. Many scholars have asserted that it is an off-shoot of Buddhism and a revolt from Hinduism. Even an eminent historian like Arnold Toynbee has asserted that Bhagavan Mahavira is the “founder of Jainism” and that the Jainas were “amongst the fossilized relics of similar societies...
Posted: 09.08.2012
 
Ancient History of Jainism can be traced back to the time of Bhagwan Rishabh Dev. It was under the reign of Chandragupta Maurya that Jainism gained recognition. History of Jainism dates back to the time of Bhagwan Rishabh Dev or Adinath. He was the first of the 24 Tirthankaras and belonged to the House of Ikshwaku, also known as the "House of the Sun". According to the Jain philosophy, Bhagwan Rishabh Dev was...
Posted: 08.08.2012
 
Jainism in the Deccan region had a strong hold. In the regions like Mysore, Kannada and areas of Mumbai and Madras Presidency Jainism had received an upsurge by the royal families. Numerous temples which are now in ruins to a great extent, as also the inscriptions and literary information prove that Jainism had numerous followers in the past and that it experienced a great boom in Maharashtra, in the Kannad...
Posted: 06.08.2012
 
Jainism in Mughal Period received great importance. The rulers of Mughal Dynasty honoured many Jain saints and scholars and also gave them various epithets. During the rule of the Mughal Dynasty rulers like Babar (1526-30), Humayun (1530-40), Sher Shah Suri (1540-55), Akbar (1556-1605), Jahangir (1605-27), Shah Jahan (1627-58), Aurangzeb (1658-1707) became kings respectively. Amongst the later Mughals, only the...
Posted: 03.08.2012
 
Jainism during Delhi Sultanate could not flourish much as some of the rulers were intolerant. However, many great Jain scholars received honour at the hands of the rulers. The rulers of Delhi were of Turk origin and followed Islam religion. They were intolerant towards the followers of Jainism and Hinduism. They even indulged in slaughtering of non-Muslims and destroying their property. They demolished temples...
Posted: 02.08.2012
 
Jainism in Mediaeval Period received much importance and was patronised by rulers of different dynasties. During this period Jain doctrine, scriptures, construction of Jain temples and installation of Jain images received much importance. Jainism in mediaeval India flourished to a great extent. The emperors of the Delhi Sultanate, Mughal Dynasty and the Rajput Clans patronised Jain religion. During the...
Posted: 25.04.2012
By Dr. Paul Marett
The Early Centuries of Jainism Jainism is one of the oldest religions in the world, so old that we cannot with certainty date its beginnings. Jain tradition tells that Mahavira twenty-forth and last of the Tīrthaṅkara or Prophets of the current cycle of the time. Some of the stories about them are truly amazing and non? Jains are rarely convinced. They are credited with enormously long spans of life and...
Posted: 29.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Tamil Nadu (I) Jainism might have reached Tamil Nadu, perhaps, a century after the nirv āṇ a of Mahāvīra . The Buddhist chronicle, Maha-vamsa (mahā-vamśa; Ch. 10) states that the Sinhalese king, Pā ṇḍ ukābhaya, built a temple for the Nigantha (niga ṇ tha) Jotiya and another for Nigantha Kumbham ḍ a. Nigantha is the pāli term for a Digambara monk. The period of this king...
Posted: 29.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Tamil Nadu (II) During the time of Raja-raja III (A.D. 1226), Kū ḍ al Ā ḷ appirantān Ē ḷ i ś ai M ō han Kā ḍ ava-rāyan made a grant to the Pārśvanātha-svāmi of Tiru-narungodai. During the same year, another grant was made to Narpa-t-ten-ayira-p-perum-palli ( nārpa-t-te ṇṇ -āyira-p-pe-rum-pa ḷḷ i) by Kolli-y-ūr O ḍ eyān for burning a lamp before the yakshi...
Posted: 22.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Karnataka (I) According to Jaina traditions, Jainism in Karnataka goes as back as Vardhamana Mahavira (vardhamāna mah ā v ī ra). Jīvandhara, one of the popular saints of Jainism, hailed from Karnataka and was initiated by Mahavira himself. A very strong (Digambara) tradition is found in the story of Acharya Bhadra-bahu (ācārya bhadra-bāhu) coming to Shravana-belgola ( ś rava ṇ...
Posted: 22.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Karnataka (II) Monasteries appeared in Karnataka around the century A.D. and later, in places like Gerasoppe, Karkala, Sangitapura, Mudubidire etc. Lineages of teachers are found mentioned in many inscriptions, which show that there was an organized monastic system in the country. This system produced great scholars like Pūjya-pāda, Ravi-kīrti, Samanta-bhadra, Aka ḷ a ṅ ka,...
Posted: 15.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Andhra Pradesh (I) The Jaina tradition is that Mahavira (mahāvīra) himself had come to the north-eastern borders of Andhra Pradesh and preached the religion. There is a tradition (represented in Pari ś i ṣṭ aparvan of Hemachandra) that Samprati, the grandson of Asoka (a ś oka), sent Jaina monks to Andhra in the capacity as his ambassadors, after instructing the people how to treat...
Posted: 15.12.2011
By P.M. Joseph
History of Jainism in Andhra Pradesh (II) Chalukyas of Kalyani (kaly āṇ i) were feudatories of Rashtrakutas, who later obtained freedom. Potalakere, their temporary capital, is identified with the present-day Patanceruvu, some 25 km from Hyderabad city. This location was having nearly five hundred basadis during those days. Jagad ē ka-malla or Jaya-simha II, who ruled from the temporary capital,...
Posted: 09.12.2011
 
History of Jainism in Kerala When Jainism made its advent in South India, Kerala was under the rule of many petty chieftains. The Chera (c ē ra) country, which was not geographically the same as the present-day Kerala, but a minor part of it, with extensions in the Coimbatore area of Tamil Nadu, was supposed to be ruled by a strong dynasty. The Jaina sources do not say anything about Kerala, but this area...
Posted: 07.02.2011
By Dr. Helmut von Glasenapp
Jainism in Bihar Mahavira was closely connected with the most significant princes of his home land. He visited the most important cities of their kingdoms in Bihar on his wanderings, Champ, Anga’s capital, Mithila in Videha, Rajgriha, the capital of Mithila, etc. and he was most respectfully received everywhere. King Bimbisara (Jainas called him by the name of Shrenik) of Magadha, the same king, who also...

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