Posted: 06.09.2012
By Pravin K. Shah
Introduction The discussion about the Samvatsari Day and Jain Calendar is always a very sensitive issue. It requires careful research and interpretation. The article presented here is not to hurt any Jain sect or its practices but to explore the subject objectively. Almost every year when we celebrate Paryushan and Samvatsari day, there is some confusion and disagreement on what day to observe Samvatsari day...
Posted: 23.07.2012
By Indrajeet Mohanty
Orissa has allured almost all the religious cults and sects right from her hoary past, whether for her tribal majority or her affluent mercantile base or her spirit of assimilation, is really, exactly not known. The earliest of the off-shoots of Brahmanism, Jainism made its presence felt in the state as early as the 7th century B.C. Excepting for one historical phase during the reign of Mahameghavahana King...
Posted: 14.02.2012
By G.V. Prof. Dr. Subrahmanyam
The first mention of Andhras is found in the Aitereya Brahmana. Clear sources for Andhra history are traced from the Satavahana Period, i.e. 2nd or 3rd Century B.C. From then on the identity of a composite Andhra culture seems to have emerged under the influence of several streams of tradition from time to time. Buddhism, Jainism, Veera Saivism, Vaishnavism and Vedic culture contributed to this evolution in...
Posted: 28.11.2011
By Prof. K.D. Bajpai
Madhya Pradesh has the proud privilege of having preserved relics and monuments of art in a remarkable manner. Jainism flourished there from very early times and has left its vestiges in the form of art and architecture. The Medieval Jaina art has characteristics of profuse ornamentation and iconometry. The iconographic details of the Jaina pantheon had been worked out in the Gupta period. The artists were...
Posted: 21.11.2011
By Kurt Titze
"Indian people are essentially a musical people. They use music for almost every function in life; whether it is a religious ceremony or a social function or an agricultural pursuit they won't hesitate to use music to lighten their hearts and make their burden less heavy" (R. Srinivasan Facets of Indian Culture, 3rd. ed. 1980: 48). Music and Dance in Jainism Having come to Jainism via Theravada Buddhism, a...
Posted: 15.11.2011
By Siddha-raj Dhadda
This paper was published in August 1935 in The Jaina Gazette (Vol. XXXII, No. 8, pp. 233-235). During my stay in South India I had the occasion to collect the following few notes regarding Kannada (Kanarese) literature which I give below, in the hope that they will stimulate the interest of scholars and bring that great provincial literature of the Canarese closer to us. It will also incidentally give the...
Posted: 03.11.2011
By Dr. Jyotsna Kamat
The process of writing in India started when letters, words and figures were drawn on sand or on a spread of grain. As time passed, other media came to be used. Blackboards with white chalk or white wooden boards with pieces of charcoal became common modes for expressing the written word. Kadatas or patas were used in religious institutions. These were made of a thick, coarse board or cloth plastered with the...
Posted: 01.11.2011
By Dr. Jyotsna Kamat
Jainism is a much more ancient faith than Buddhism. Jinas or Tirthankars are founders of Jainism. There were twenty-three Tirthankaras before Mahavira, who was a contemporary of Gautama Buddha (6th century BCE) and is credited with formulation of a sect known as Jainism. Jainas laid great stress on right knowledge and right conduct for self-realization. It was a full-fledged sect with well-organized sanghas in...
Posted: 25.03.2011
 
The Symbol of Jainism The Jain Symbol is a congregation of various symbols, each having a deeper meaning. This symbol was adopted by all sects of Jainism while commemorating the 2500th anniversary of the nirvana of Lord Mahavira. The outline of the symbol is defined as the universe (Lok). The lower part of the symbol represents the seven hells (Naraki). The middle part of the universe contains the Earth and the...
Posted: 14.02.2011
By T.V.G. Sastri
Jain Literature and Acharya Kundakunda The Jain Literature is remarkable for its variety and vastness and chronological sequence of events, not merely confined not merely to religious tradition, but also to other branches such as geography, history, science and socio-political studies. Only in the last 50 years, there began research into this literature. Since the nirvana of Mahavira in 527 BCE, Jain literature...

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