Posted: 20.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
The pratimā (the intensive course of austere practice undertaken with determination and performed in conformity with the prescribed procedure) has a specific description in the Jain spiritual tradition. It is desirable to discuss it in the present context. The specific criteria of penance or the special rule of spiritual practicing is known as pratimā. The meaning of pratimā in Sthānā...
Posted: 19.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
Practice of postures has been sanctioned in the Jain tradition of spiritual practice. Lord Mahavira himself practiced the postures. He used to meditate remaining in a particular yogic posture. The Lord engaged himself in meditation, being seated in the proper posture. The principle postures of Lord Mahavira during the time period of his spiritual practice are the 'ukkuḍ u' posture, vira posture, milking...
Posted: 18.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
Attachment towards body and outfits is natural. This sense of attachment becomes a cause of worldliness. Indeed, to give up the sense of attachment is essentially the motive of the dhuta practice. Pride and arrogance make a person intoxicated. Knowledge of self is destroyed by these vices. A spiritual practitioner becomes intoxicated with supernatural powers, pleasurable and comfortable feelings. He starts...
Posted: 17.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
'Dhuta' was a popular word in the ancient Indian tradition of spiritual practice and it had a reputed status in all the Indian religions. It has also been mentioned in the ancient text like Ācārā ṅ ga of Jain tradition. There is a description of thirteen types of 'dhuta' in 'Visuddhimagga', a famous scripture in the Buddhist religion. Its reference is also found in the Bhāgavata . The...
Posted: 16.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
Vīrya means energy. The spiritual practitioner should not hide his energy. Lord Mahavira has said- ' ṇ o ṇ ihejja vīriya ṃ ’ , which means do not conceal your energy. Its use is required in the field of spiritual practice. The use of one's functional energy in the practice of knowledge, faith, conduct and penance is called conduct qua energy. It has been said in...
Posted: 15.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
In the Indian spiritual system, penance has an important role. Both Jain and Vedic thinkers have considered it as an essential part of spiritual practice. Penance is a key factor in the elimination of karmas. It makes the soul pure. According to Jain spiritual practice, the meaning of penance is not only restricted to austerities and fasting but also includes scriptural study, meditation, reverence etc. which...
Posted: 14.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
The spiritual practice that eliminates karmic bondage is known as the right conduct. eya ṃ cayarittakara ṃ , cāritta ṃ hoi āhiya ṃ Right conduct (practice) is that which provides salvation. Characteristic of right conduct is involvement in good conduct and refraining from bad conduct. There are five types of conduct. Actually it is one. The classification of five types of...
Posted: 13.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
The conduct that is related to the right faith is known as Darśanācāra (the conduct of faith).. Right faith means faith and interest in truth. Right faith is of two types-(i) transcendental (ii) empirical. The transcendental right faith is related to the internal purification of the soul only and the empirical right faith is related to the monastic, sects or sampradāya ...
Posted: 12.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
Jñānācāra (Conduct-qua-knowledge) Although, there are five kinds of knowledge, śrutajñāna is the only knowledge that can be practiced. Mati (perceptual cognition), Avadhi (clairvoyant knowledge), Manahparyava (knowledge qua mind reading), and kevala (omniscience) - these four kinds of knowledge have no relation with practice. All our communication and behavior is carried out on the basis of śruta...
Posted: 11.07.2019
By Dr. Samani Mangal Pragya
Conduct is that which has to be practiced. Generally, conduct is associated with character, but in Jain tradition, concept of conduct is discussed with a much wider approach. Its relation is not only with character, but also with knowledge (jñāna), faith (darśana), character with relation to abstinence (cāritra), penance (tapa) & spiritual energy (vīrya). According to the Jain...

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